Mapping the devastation of Somalia’s drought

Over the past 25 years, Somalia has experienced a cycle of protracted droughts, culminating in the most recent one in 2016 and 2017, when rains failed for three seasons in a row.

Tragically, drought images from the country are so familiar that they rarely make the headlines. But the situation in Somalia has grown desperate. The recent drought has caused spikes in food scarcity, malnutrition, and cholera and other diseases; it has also driven people from the rural areas into the cities. In 2017, 1.2 million children were projected to be acutely malnourished; 80,000 children were forced to stop attending school; and 120,000 risked dropping out.

“Food security needs are nearly double the five-year average, and an estimated 6.2 million people need humanitarian assistance,” Special representative of the UN Secretary-General to Somalia Michael Keating told the UN Security Council on 24 January. “Given the recurrent nature of droughts in Somalia, an imperative is to address the root causes of Somalia’s fragility and to build resilience to shocks. This is needed to prevent further refugee flows and displacement.”

To identify the causes of the drought, assess its impact and damage, and develop a recovery strategy, the Federal Government of Somalia requested a Drought Impact and Needs Assessment as well as a Resilience and Recovery Framework to map out the way forward.

In response to that call, over 180 experts from the Government of Somalia and international partners collected, validated and analyzed data and developed recovery strategies across 18 sectors and cross-cutting areas. The process was led by Somalia’s Ministry of Planning, Investment and Economic Development, with support from the UN Somalia Country Team, the World Bank and the European Union…Continue reading

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *